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The Blood of Komodo Dragons Could Help Us to Slay Antibiotic Resistance

The Blood of Komodo Dragons Could Help Us to Slay Antibiotic Resistance

Science
Protein fragments in the blood of Komodo dragons have antimicrobial properties that help them resist toxic bacteria, and they could be used to develop new drugs to counter antibiotic resistance, researchers have found. The Komodo dragon is the world's largest lizard, growing up to 3 metres (9.8 feet) in length and weighing up to 70 kilograms (154 lbs). It lives on five small islands in Indonesia, where its massive size and sharp teeth enable it to feast on prey as large as water buffalo – but there's another, less obvious reason why you definitely don't want to get bitten by one. Previous research has found that the mouths of Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis) contain up to 57 kinds of dangerous bacteria. It's not entirely clear, where this bacteria come from. More recently,
See Mammoth ‘Hole’ Open In This Lake

See Mammoth ‘Hole’ Open In This Lake

Science
It may look like a portal to certain death, but the spillway in Lake Berryessa is a life-saver.At approximately 72 feet wide and 245 feet long, the spillway acts as a drain for the Monticello Dam in Napa Valley, California. As water spirals down the spillway, it travels horizontally 2,000 feet before draining into nearby Putah Creek. Created in the 1940s to supply water for irrigation and drinking, the Monticello Dam services close to 600,000 people in the area. It can hold 526 billion gallons before excess water must be drained away. In the past couple months, the Napa region has seen record rainfalls, and the dam has become so gorged that its water capacity has reached the safe maximum limit. Kevin King, the water and power operations manager at Solan...
A Physicist Just Explained Why the Large Hadron Collider Disproves the Existence of Ghosts

A Physicist Just Explained Why the Large Hadron Collider Disproves the Existence of Ghosts

Science
Recent polls have found that 42 percent of Americans and 52 percent of people in the UK believe in ghosts - a huge percentage when you consider that no one has ever come up with irrefutable proof that they even exist. But we might have had proof that they don't exist all along, because as British theoretical physicist Brian Cox recently pointed out, there's no room in the Standard Model of Physics for a substance or medium that can carry on our information after death, and yet go undetected in the Large Hadron Collider. "If we want some sort of pattern that carries information about our living cells to persist, then we must specify precisely what medium carries that pattern, and how it interacts with the matter particles out of which our bodies are made," Cox, from the University...
Live: found a solar system with six “Lands” in a distant star

Live: found a solar system with six “Lands” in a distant star

Science
Now, scientists will answer some questions on Twitter, through the hashtag #asknasa 19.39 Little by little, thanks to this type of research, it will be possible to understand what are the necessary ingredients for life to appear in the stars. 19.34They believe that these planets formed in an area very rich in water ice, and then trapped by gravity in the vicinity of TRAPPIST-1. Their orbits resemble those of the gigantic planet Jupiter and its moons. In fact, the TRAPPIST-1 star is barely larger than this planet. 19.33One very interesting thing about stars like TRAPPIST-1 is that they can live 1,000 times longer than the Sun. They are very small and burn fuel very slowly, so they are very long-lived. So, in case there was life, it would have much more time. 19.31 The new Ja
Medicinal marijuana importation approved by Federal Government to boost supplies

Medicinal marijuana importation approved by Federal Government to boost supplies

Science
Medical marijuana will soon be easier to access amid moves by the Federal Government to loosen importation laws. Imported medicinal marijuana — used to treat patients with chronic or painful illnesses including cancer, severe epilepsy and motor neurone disease — could be available under the Government's new scheme in eight weeks, according to Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt. The medication is currently sourced from overseas on a case-by-case basis, but the new scheme would see an interim fast track on importation while local cultivation — which has been legal since October 2016 — increases to meet demand. Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said it was the "first time in history" the Government would facilitate an import process for the interim supply. Mr Hunt said the chan